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The Sir Robin of Locksley Gin truly lives up to its legendary name.

Everything about it is quintessentially British, from its name, its inspiration and its home in Sheffield.

John Cherry, a native of Sheffield, founded The Locksey Distilling Co. in 2006, when his New York born wife convinced him to return home to start a distillery. More than a decade later and his distillery is thriving.

The company forms part of a cooperative in Sheffield, based in Portland Works, a grade II listed building built in 1869.

The brand has a lot of heritage wrapped up in both the distillery and the name. It is called after Robin Hood, who is said to have been born the nearby Loxley Valley.

This is an intriguing Gin that aims to fall “somewhere between a London Dry style and an Old Tom”.

It is made with the usual botanicals but brings in elderflower, dandelion and pink grapefruit to give a nice twist on the classic Gin flavour.

The nose begins with lots of juniper and elderflower. These are the boldest flavours and the elderflower adds a nice sweet note throughout.

It has a refreshing aroma, with a hint of cardamom and delicate floral notes appearing.

The grapefruit adds a citrusy tang, which grows on the palate. The elderflower really makes itself known here and the sweetness that is typical of an Old Tom Gin peeks through.

It continues with more citrus and floral notes, and the odd hint of juniper here and there. This Gin also has a lovely warming quality that really brings it to life.

This is quite an earthy Gin, with a wonderfully natural feel to it. The botanicals are fresh and spirited, with lots of flavours coming out.

The finish is dry and soft, with yet more pink grapefruit and lots of elderflower sweetness.

This is a brilliant Gin with an impressive flavour profile to it. One can only assume that Sir Robin himself could only be too proud to have such a fine product named after him. Definitely one for the liquor cabinet.

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