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An entrepreneurial adventure, Langley’s was born in 2011, although the name has been associated with distilling for many years longer.

A Combination of Reputation and Age

Langley’s is a brand based in the Midlands that was set up at Crosswells Brewery. They have been making Gin for decades and are well-known throughout the industry.

It was the name Langley’s that attracted Mark Dawkins and Mark Crump to joining forces with the brand. It has been a well-established name in the Gin industry since the 1800s and it is solidly British.

The brand was keen to get involved, since they were purveyors of premium Gins already, and adding more Gin to their roster is always a good thing.

In 2011 the two came together, and with the Langley’s name and Dawkins and Crump’s combined 50 years of experience in the drinks industry, Langley’s Gin was born.

The Gin was well received and won the title of Master at the 2013 Spirit’s Business Gin Masters, the first time it was ever entered.

The Gin

Langley’s have a range that includes a London Dry named No. 8, an English Gin named First Chapter and an Old Tom.

Their Old Tom is an excellent example of the style. It is presented in a brown tinted bottle, with a vintage label as well, so they capture the heritage of the category, which dates back to the Victorian era.

It opens with big notes of citrus and juniper, capturing the typical flavour profile of a Gin, with really bold and juicy notes of oranges.

The palate is aromatic and slightly spicy, with fragrant fennel and nutmeg coming through.

The spice adds real depth and is exquisite alongside the sweeter citrus notes.

There is also a distinctly fresh and natural flavour to this Old Tom, with hints of coriander, dew covered grass and pine needles.

The finish is well rounded and packed with juniper and lemons.

This is a wonderful example of an Old Tom, and certainly worth exploring.

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